• Welcome to the Framer's Corner Forum, hosted by the Professional Picture Framers Association. (PPFA)
    You will have to register a free account, before you can access the system. If you have already registered, please LOG IN
    If you have already registered, but can't remember your password, CLICK HERE to reset it.
Complete your certified picture framer test online CPF

Is there any interest in improved glass?

Andrew Gartley

New participant
Messages
2
Location
Lakewood, OH
Company
Newry Corp
Hi All,

I work for a consulting company and I am currently doing a project looking at the glass used in framing. I am trying to understand whether the current glass options are satisfactory or whether there would be interest or need among the framing community for improved glass options. Would there be any value to improvements like reducing the weight, improving the strength/scratch resistance, or reducing the thickness of the glass? Are there other improvements that would be particularly compelling?
 

Jerry Feig CPF

Frequent Poster
Certified Picture Framer®
Messages
266
Location
Detroit, MI
Company
minoxy LL C
I see no need to have several types of UV filtering glass other than standard glass (reg or low iron) and ~98% UV filtering coated glass, with or without an anti-reflective coating.
For my enclosures I use 4.4 mm laminated glass with an AR coating. The internal lamination material between the glass being UV filtering.
 

Andrew Gartley

New participant
Messages
2
Location
Lakewood, OH
Company
Newry Corp
I see no need to have several types of UV filtering glass other than standard glass (reg or low iron) and ~98% UV filtering coated glass, with or without an anti-reflective coating.
For my enclosures I use 4.4 mm laminated glass with an AR coating. The internal lamination material between the glass being UV filtering.
Thanks Jerry, I appreciate the help!
 

Russ Wood

Frequent Poster
Messages
688
Location
Lakewood Colorado
Company
Grey Owl Framing
You mentioned thinner and less heavy glass (vs. glazing). Thin glass is good for shipping, but thin glass breaks more easily too. How many of us have to replace that really thin glass that comes on many of the Chinese preframed ‘artwork’. As a framer I don’t want really thin glass; I want the customer to be able to get the Frsme home without damaging
 

Jim Miller MCPF GCF

Frequent Poster
GCF Guild
Master Certified Picture Framer®
Messages
1,801
Location
Central Ohio
Company
ARTFRAME, Inc.
In my opinion, we already have plenty of glazing choices, both glass and acrylic. Last time I counted, there were more than a dozen alternatives.

Rather than focusing on new product variations, I would suggest focusing on innovations in the supply chain. It's expensive to ship such a fragile, heavy product without damage, so most of us have to buy our glass from local distributors who deliver free or at reasonable cost. As a result, the American market is dominated by one manufacturer that has managed to develop a massive distribution network. However, if other existing suppliers could provide what we need at a reasonable acquired cost (read: including shipping), that could inspire competition and possibly change the market considerably.
 
Welcome to Framers Corner
PPFA Connect Newsletter
Top